Of Words and Images
All my Inapirations and Timey-Wimey Stuff
posted 4 hours ago + 280 notes — via noxfae, © elfofthewoodlandrealm
"Her river my blood and her rock my bones. Her earth my muscle, her heart my soul."
— Earth Warrior - Omnia
#Quote #Concepts


posted 4 hours ago + 52,541 notes — via vinhallen, © chundubu
#People #Men #nsfw #shirtless


posted 4 hours ago + 110,404 notes — via artistnonchalant, © nospheratusblack666
drtanner:

age-of-awakening:


 What angels are apparently supposed to look like according to
They had 6 wings, covered with eyes on the wings. And had two eyes on their face, but used 2 wings to cover their face at all times because if a mortal ever saw their face they would die.
 The bible mentions multiple faces, being covered in eyeballs, constant singing, lion heads etc.
 Besides being described as beasts and monsters, they’re practically brainless drones. Heavenly angels are only one step removed from demons. The only difference is demons fell from heaven because they chose to follow Lucifer, who was an angel (angel of music and one of god’s favorites). So they are these eyeball covered animal mashed up monsters who were only created to worship for eternity (part of humanities creation was so that something would choose to love god, not just worship him because they were created to).
Angels fall into a lot of new age and conspiracy beliefs.We were taught that the supernatural realms went in the order of Heaven, Hell, then Earth. So when the angels fell from heaven with Lucifer, some fell through hell and landed on Earth. We were taught they intermarried with early humans and created giants and taught witch craft to women.
Technically, angels have made their only moral choice, and so experience morality only in theory.Some angel characters are based on the non-humanoid or vaguely humanoid “canon” angels, which can be anything from a ball of wings covered in eyes to a huge, living wheel to animals on fire.
 They’re abominations, they’re alien, they’re beyond us. They’re creatures that biology as we know it does not apply to. Often they do not love mankind, they love God and God alone.
Maybe angels taking on human form but describing just what they look like when they’re not wearing their skin.
Angels are such creepy and interesting.

The study of angelology is EVEN MORE interesting with a literal and scientific approach to understand what ancients have said regarding angelic deities. It’s a beautiful study

There is a damned good reason why the first thing out of an angel’s mouth whenever it appears to a mortal person in the Bible is “DO NOT FEAR”, and it’s because angels are fucking terrifying.

drtanner:

age-of-awakening:

 What angels are apparently supposed to look like according to

They had 6 wings, covered with eyes on the wings. And had two eyes on their face, but used 2 wings to cover their face at all times because if a mortal ever saw their face they would die.

 The bible mentions multiple faces, being covered in eyeballs, constant singing, lion heads etc.

 Besides being described as beasts and monsters, they’re practically brainless drones. Heavenly angels are only one step removed from demons. The only difference is demons fell from heaven because they chose to follow Lucifer, who was an angel (angel of music and one of god’s favorites). So they are these eyeball covered animal mashed up monsters who were only created to worship for eternity (part of humanities creation was so that something would choose to love god, not just worship him because they were created to).

Angels fall into a lot of new age and conspiracy beliefs.We were taught that the supernatural realms went in the order of Heaven, Hell, then Earth. So when the angels fell from heaven with Lucifer, some fell through hell and landed on Earth. We were taught they intermarried with early humans and created giants and taught witch craft to women.

Technically, angels have made their only moral choice, and so experience morality only in theory.
Some angel characters are based on the non-humanoid or vaguely humanoid “canon” angels, which can be anything from a ball of wings covered in eyes to a huge, living wheel to animals on fire.

 They’re abominations, they’re alien, they’re beyond us. They’re creatures that biology as we know it does not apply to. Often they do not love mankind, they love God and God alone.

Maybe angels taking on human form but describing just what they look like when they’re not wearing their skin.

Angels are such creepy and interesting.

The study of angelology is EVEN MORE interesting with a literal and scientific approach to understand what ancients have said regarding angelic deities. It’s a beautiful study

There is a damned good reason why the first thing out of an angel’s mouth whenever it appears to a mortal person in the Bible is “DO NOT FEAR”, and it’s because angels are fucking terrifying.

#Mythology #Angels #Angelology #(tagged as 'mythology' for personal convenience)


posted 7 hours ago + 184 notes — via spells-of-life
#Beauty #Drink


posted 8 hours ago + 595 notes — via nibi-nix, © howdoyousaveme

{70/∞} pictures of Sebby Stan
{70/pictures of Sebby Stan
#Sebastian Stan


posted 11 hours ago + 105 notes — via nibi-nix, © lingerie-for-dita.blogspot.com
dita-von:

Dita Von Teese http://dita-von.tumblr.com/

dita-von:

Dita Von Teese http://dita-von.tumblr.com/

#Dita von Teese


posted 14 hours ago + 21,716 notes — via thewritingcafe
thewritingcafe:

Guide to Writing Steampunk
BASICS

Punk Genres: most common genres are in italics


Atomicpunk: Optimistic retro science fiction based on the Space Age. Think The Jetsons.
Biopunk: This genre is about altering genetics and DNA. These stories often take place in the near-future in which humans have been altered or in which human experimentation is common.
Candlepunk: Similar to clockpunk, but darker and with less technology.
Clockpunk: Think Da Vinci’s inventions, but more advanced while. This genre follows the aesthetics and technology of Western civilization during the mid to late middle ages, though sometimes it’s set in the Victorian era.
Cyberpunk: Has advanced technology and often focuses on artificial intelligence and the cyber world. The setting is often near-future rather than far-future. Blade Runner is an example.
Dieselpunk: Based on aesthetics and technology between World War I and World War II, sometimes up until the Cold War.
Decopunk: Ranges from the aesthetics of the 1920’s to the 1950’s. Decopunk aesthetic is heavily based on modernism. Less gritty than dieselpunk.
Elfpunk: Basically urban fantasy, but with common high or epic fantasy creatures put in an urban setting rather than vampires and werewolves.
Nanopunk: Similar to biopunk, but biotechnology is less available and nanotechnology is common.
Sandalpunk: Set in ancient worlds, such as Rome, but with advanced technology.
Splatterpunk: Extremely graphic and contains a lot of gore.
Steampunk: This genre gets its name from the heavy steam-powered technology involved. Aesthetics are based on the Victorian and industrial eras of the Western world, though other cultural elements may be used.
Western Steampunk: Similar to steampunk, but with Western (as in Wild West) aesthetics and settings.
So why are there so many sub genres? For starters, they help agents and publishers get an idea of what they’re in for if you’re going through the traditional publishing route. While bookstores usually just put these genres within science fiction or fantasy, you can still market your book through sub genres to reach a specific group of people who are looking for these genres. However, there are a lot of sub genres, most of which many have not heard of. If you’ve written one of these genres and intend to publish it, the best would be to put it under another name (with the exception of steampunk, cyberpunk, and biopunk). For example, if you have written a candlepunk story, you can propose it as fantasy, alternate historical fiction, or any other genre it may fit in. While atomicpunk is quite common, it’s not well known by that name. If you have written an atompunk story, the best way to market it would be to call it retro science fiction. But what’s the difference between punk genres and historical fiction? The technology is a big difference. It’s usually more advanced for the time it’s modeled after.
 
TECHNOLOGY

The technology is one of the defining aspects of steampunk. It’s the basis for the world you’re writing in. For the typical steampunk story, technology will be (of course) steam powered.
 


A Guide to Steampunk Gadgets and Technology
Airship
Steampunk Airships Inspiration
Steampunk Blimps
Technology Steampunk Instructables
Steampunk Technology Inspiration
How Steampunk Works
Steampunk Gadgets
100 Functional Steampunk Gadgets

CHARACTERS & FASHION

Another defining feature of steampunk is the aesthetics and the characters. Steampunk takes the latter part of the word (punk) to mean the opposition of the mainstream, though that’s not always necessary in your story.

Research jobs common in the Victorian age and add steam to it. Your characters will revolve around their setting and their clothing may be a part of that too.


Steampunk Archetypes
Steampunk Clothing References
Steampunk as Aesthetic
Steampunk Character Inspiration
Steampunk Character Building
Characters, Personalities, and Personas

READING

Best Steampunk Books
Steampunk
Best Steampunk and Gaslight
Favorite Steampunk/Alt History
Best Fantasy, Steampunk, and Science Fiction BDSM
Asian Steampunk
Buttkicking Female Steampunk
Best Steampunk YA Books
Best Unknown Steampunk
Steampunk Adventures
Gay Steampunk
Best Vampire Steampunk
Steampunk Novels and Short Stories
Best of Cyberpunk
Best Cyberpunk Books
Books with Cyberpunk Themes
Books About Video Games and Virtual Reality

MORE
Researching Steampunk
A Brief Introduction to Steampunk
Steampunk Tropes
What is Steampunk?
So You Want to: Write a Steampunk Story
Steampunk Inspiration
8 Tips and Tricks Every Steampunk Writer Should Know
Writing Steampunk Fiction Tips
Kady Cross Shares her Secrets to Writing Steampunk
Tips for Successfully Creating Steampunk
Steampunk Wiki
List of Writing Steampunk Resources
Steampunk: a List of Themes
How to Write Steampunk
Writing Steampunk
Tips for Writing Steampunk
CYBERPUNK
Cyberpunk
Technology in Cyberpunk
Cyberpunk Technology
History of Cyberpunk
Cyberpunk Esstentials
What Happened to Cyberpunk?
Cyberpunk Fashion (2) (3) (4)
Cyberpunk Attitude

thewritingcafe:

Guide to Writing Steampunk

BASICS

Punk Genres: most common genres are in italics

  • Atomicpunk: Optimistic retro science fiction based on the Space Age. Think The Jetsons.
  • BiopunkThis genre is about altering genetics and DNA. These stories often take place in the near-future in which humans have been altered or in which human experimentation is common.
  • Candlepunk: Similar to clockpunk, but darker and with less technology.
  • ClockpunkThink Da Vinci’s inventions, but more advanced while. This genre follows the aesthetics and technology of Western civilization during the mid to late middle ages, though sometimes it’s set in the Victorian era.
  • Cyberpunk: Has advanced technology and often focuses on artificial intelligence and the cyber world. The setting is often near-future rather than far-future. Blade Runner is an example.
  • Dieselpunk: Based on aesthetics and technology between World War I and World War II, sometimes up until the Cold War.
  • Decopunk: Ranges from the aesthetics of the 1920’s to the 1950’s. Decopunk aesthetic is heavily based on modernism. Less gritty than dieselpunk.
  • Elfpunk: Basically urban fantasy, but with common high or epic fantasy creatures put in an urban setting rather than vampires and werewolves.
  • Nanopunk: Similar to biopunk, but biotechnology is less available and nanotechnology is common.
  • Sandalpunk: Set in ancient worlds, such as Rome, but with advanced technology.
  • Splatterpunk: Extremely graphic and contains a lot of gore.
  • Steampunk: This genre gets its name from the heavy steam-powered technology involved. Aesthetics are based on the Victorian and industrial eras of the Western world, though other cultural elements may be used.
  • Western Steampunk: Similar to steampunk, but with Western (as in Wild West) aesthetics and settings.
So why are there so many sub genres? For starters, they help agents and publishers get an idea of what they’re in for if you’re going through the traditional publishing route. While bookstores usually just put these genres within science fiction or fantasy, you can still market your book through sub genres to reach a specific group of people who are looking for these genres.
 
However, there are a lot of sub genres, most of which many have not heard of. If you’ve written one of these genres and intend to publish it, the best would be to put it under another name (with the exception of steampunk, cyberpunk, and biopunk). For example, if you have written a candlepunk story, you can propose it as fantasy, alternate historical fiction, or any other genre it may fit in. While atomicpunk is quite common, it’s not well known by that name. If you have written an atompunk story, the best way to market it would be to call it retro science fiction.
 
But what’s the difference between punk genres and historical fiction? The technology is a big difference. It’s usually more advanced for the time it’s modeled after.
 
TECHNOLOGY
The technology is one of the defining aspects of steampunk. It’s the basis for the world you’re writing in. For the typical steampunk story, technology will be (of course) steam powered.
 
CHARACTERS & FASHION
Another defining feature of steampunk is the aesthetics and the characters. Steampunk takes the latter part of the word (punk) to mean the opposition of the mainstream, though that’s not always necessary in your story.
Research jobs common in the Victorian age and add steam to it. Your characters will revolve around their setting and their clothing may be a part of that too.
READING

MORE

CYBERPUNK

#Steampunk #Reference #Resources


posted 14 hours ago + 208 notes — via noxfae, © scriiipt
scriiipt:

I by VarencaFISH

scriiipt:

I by VarencaFISH

#People #Women #Fantasy


posted 14 hours ago + 2,724 notes — via expelliarmus, © zrinkacvitesic

'Doctor Who': Peter Capaldi and Jenna Coleman in EW Portraits 

#Doctor Who #Peter Capaldi #Jenna Louise Coleman


posted 1 day ago + 422 notes — via miss-cath, © shitthesignssay

shitthesignssay:

I made these for the people that are new to astrology and don’t understand what we’re talking about :) Hopefully it helps a little! I’ll make a few more in the future if people like it.

#Astrology #Reference


posted 1 day ago + 14,074 notes — via miss-cath, © popchartlab.com

nevver:

Opening lines diagrammed

#Literature


posted 1 day ago + 157,544 notes — via nibi-nix, © amandaonwriting

amandaonwriting:

Nine Wonderful Words About Words from 25 things you had no idea there were words for

#Words


posted 1 day ago + 3,682 notes — via ohmystarsy, © mythandrists
mythandrists:

1. Anyone who says “write what you know” either doesn’t know what they’re talking about or doesn’t know how to form a sentence. Know what you write. Do your research, but don’t think that just because you haven’t done your research yet doesn’t mean you’re not qualified to write about whatever you want. Don’t pigeonhole yourself. Pigeonholing sounds like a bad sex position, anyway.
2. Write badly. Write terribly, obnoxiously, fearlessly, write complete garbage, write melodrama, write too many details and extra scenes you’re going to have to cut later. Here’s a secret: Everyone’s first draft is shit. Yes, even Kerouac - have you read On the Road? Give yourself permission to suck. Write badly on purpose, but write badly in the way only you can write badly. Revision is for final drafts, not first drafts.
3. Semicolons are beautiful, but only if you actually know how to use them. Learn how to use them. Then use them. Don’t let your creative writing professor tell your that your poetry looks like an essay when you use actual punctuation; your creative writing professor is not you. Your creative writing professor doesn’t know what he’s talking about.
4. Except that your creative writing professor does know what he’s talking about. Listen to him. Learn from him. Write down all his advice in your notebook, but when it comes time to start writing - close the notebook.
5. Write every day.
6. But if you don’t write every day, don’t beat yourself up about it. Don’t beat yourself up, period. Self-loathing is antithetical to writing, unless you’re Gerard Manley Hopkins, but trust me, you don’t want to live the way Hopkins lived.
7. Stop thinking so damn much. Blare the music when you write; sit in a crowded coffee shop; drink; let yourself go. The first draft doesn’t want to be constrained; the first draft wants to be put on the page. The first draft wants a word count, not a rubric.
8. You’re always allowed to slam the door on someone who’s distracting you from your writing. Unless that person is a tax collector or your mother. Never slam a door on your mother unless she’s a drunk.
9. Everything has been done before. Get over it.
10. Love what you do. If you burn out, if you don’t love it anymore, either quit or find a way to love it again. Don’t do it for anyone else - no one’s paying you to be a writer. Pay yourself. Pay yourself in interesting characters and immersive plots and worlds you wish you could play around in. Give your writing to yourself. Treat it like a gift from you to you, because if you don’t love your final draft, no one else will, either.

mythandrists:

1. Anyone who says “write what you know” either doesn’t know what they’re talking about or doesn’t know how to form a sentence. Know what you write. Do your research, but don’t think that just because you haven’t done your research yet doesn’t mean you’re not qualified to write about whatever you want. Don’t pigeonhole yourself. Pigeonholing sounds like a bad sex position, anyway.

2. Write badly. Write terribly, obnoxiously, fearlessly, write complete garbage, write melodrama, write too many details and extra scenes you’re going to have to cut later. Here’s a secret: Everyone’s first draft is shit. Yes, even Kerouac - have you read On the Road? Give yourself permission to suck. Write badly on purpose, but write badly in the way only you can write badly. Revision is for final drafts, not first drafts.

3. Semicolons are beautiful, but only if you actually know how to use them. Learn how to use them. Then use them. Don’t let your creative writing professor tell your that your poetry looks like an essay when you use actual punctuation; your creative writing professor is not you. Your creative writing professor doesn’t know what he’s talking about.

4. Except that your creative writing professor does know what he’s talking about. Listen to him. Learn from him. Write down all his advice in your notebook, but when it comes time to start writing - close the notebook.

5. Write every day.

6. But if you don’t write every day, don’t beat yourself up about it. Don’t beat yourself up, period. Self-loathing is antithetical to writing, unless you’re Gerard Manley Hopkins, but trust me, you don’t want to live the way Hopkins lived.

7. Stop thinking so damn much. Blare the music when you write; sit in a crowded coffee shop; drink; let yourself go. The first draft doesn’t want to be constrained; the first draft wants to be put on the page. The first draft wants a word count, not a rubric.

8. You’re always allowed to slam the door on someone who’s distracting you from your writing. Unless that person is a tax collector or your mother. Never slam a door on your mother unless she’s a drunk.

9. Everything has been done before. Get over it.

10. Love what you do. If you burn out, if you don’t love it anymore, either quit or find a way to love it again. Don’t do it for anyone else - no one’s paying you to be a writer. Pay yourself. Pay yourself in interesting characters and immersive plots and worlds you wish you could play around in. Give your writing to yourself. Treat it like a gift from you to you, because if you don’t love your final draft, no one else will, either.

#Writing #Motivation


posted 1 day ago + 1,248 notes — via ohmystarsy, © raybolger

hannigraham:

HISTORY MEME|||{7/10 moments}
T H E  D A N C I N G  P L A G U E  O F  1 5 1 8 ●

It happened. It may be one of the most bizarre things in history, but it happened. In 1518, the people of Strasbourg, France “danced themselves to death” for no obvious reason One woman started it, and others joined her. Within a month, there were 400 people involved.

As the situation in Strasbourg got worse, the rulers of the land started to become concerned:

"[the people] sought the advice of local physicians, who ruled out astrological and supernatural causes, instead announcing that the plague was a ‘natural disease’ caused by ‘hot blood.’ However, instead of prescribing bleeding, authorities encouraged more dancing, in part by opening two guildhalls and a grain market, and even constructing a wooden stage. The authorities did this because they believed that the dancers would only recover if they danced continuously night and day. To increase the effectiveness of the cure, authorities even paid for musicians to keep the afflicted moving."

Now, according to John Waller, who wrote not one, but TWO books on the event, the outbreak was caused by mass psychogenic illness (MPI), a manifestation of mass hysteria that is often preceded by extreme levels of psychological distress. According to Waller, a famine, caused by cold winters, hot summers, crop frosts, and violent hailstorms. In addition to the wide-spread famine, smallpox, syphilis, and leprosy afflicted the populace, as well. Waller believes this series of events might have triggered the MPI.

#Interesting


posted 1 day ago + 26,357 notes — via rovenka, © theclearlydope
#Gpoy #Funny #Random #Men